Cape Breton Highlands National Park

CBHNPcbhnpparkscanadalogo

Welcome to Cape Breton Highlands National Park

Where the Mountains Meet the Sea!

Cape Breton Highlands National Park As You’ve Never Seen Before (Video Credit – Brinton Photography)

Adventure awaits in Cape Breton Highlands National Park! Accessible to all via the famous Cabot Trail, the park protects 950 square kilometres of majestic plateau, deeply cut river canyons and spectacular coastal scenery

A park pass is required from May to October for park use. FREE for Youth to Ages 18 in 2018!

For more information on fees and services, visit park facilities, call 902-224-2306, or visit parkscanada.gc.ca/capebreton

One of Canada’s most enchanting places, where the mountains meet the sea

As you hug the world-famous Cabot Trail coastline you’ll wind through Cape Breton Highlands National Park, where lush, forested river canyons carve into the ancient plateau, edged by rust-coloured cliffs

Keep your eyes open for moose and bald eagles. You might even catch a minke or pilot whale breaking waves in the Atlantic, or Gulf of St. Lawrence. And you’re never far from a steaming plate of local lobster fresh from the ocean around you.

Cape Breton Highland National Park Visitor Guide 2018

CapeBretonHighlandsNationalParkVisitorsGuide2018

CBMinute

Take a few seconds for CB MinuteCB Minute is about keeping informed of what’s happening at Parks Canada places in Cape Breton and Canso. Read on – help us spread the word!

August 2018

CBMinuteAugust2018

Issue 16 | August 2018

Sunday Night at the Movies
It’s Sunday night at the movies at Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site! Bad Buoy Film Society is showing a movie every Sunday at 7 p.m. for the next four weeks. The films are: “Weirdos” (July 29), “My Enemy, My Brother” (August 5), “Lucky” (August 12) and “Indian Horse” (August 19). Bad Buoy Film Society is all about creating access to culturally significant films and their offerings were very popular last year. All of the films have adult themes. Tickets are $10 and are available at the site or reserve by email at badbuoyfilmsociety@gmail.com.

Swim the Canal
The 5th annual “Swim the Canal” event at St. Peters Canal National Historic Site is just around the corner. This not-to-be-missed event organized by Village on the Canal attracts hundreds of swimmers and spectators. The swim starts at 3:30 p.m. on August 5 with registration at 2 p.m. on the Battery Provincial Park side of the canal. Swimmers can either swim 800 metres to the world-famous Bras d’Or Lake through St. Peters Canal National Historic Site, ending at Battery Provincial Park beach or swim 100 metres from Battery Park to the canal wall and back. Not sure you want to swim? Be part of the cheering squad!

Sunrise and Sunset on the Skyline
The Skyline Trail is spectacular any time but have you tried it at the dawning of a new day or enjoyed it at sunset as the ocean glistens below? Why not check out the Skyline Sunrise Hike and watch the sun rise over the mountains? Pre-registration is required and space is limited. The hike is August 5 and starts one hour before sunrise. The Skyline Sunset Hike is available daily and starts 2.5 hours before sunset. Each hike cost $14.70 per person. Here, the mountains truly meet the sea.

Meet Daniel Stone
Daniel Stone, author of The Food Explorer: The True Adventures of the Globe-Trotting Botanist Who Transformed What America Eats will be at Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site on August 11 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. signing copies of his book. What’s the connection to Alexander Graham Bell, you might ask? David Fairchild, husband of Alexander and Mabel Bell’s younger daughter, Daisy, is the subject of Daniel Stone’s book. In addition to signing copies of his book, Daniel will be part of a panel discussion, along with descendants of David Fairchild and extended family. There will also be an activity for children. This event is organized by the Alexander Graham Bell Museum Association and the Alexander Graham Bell Foundation.

Stargazing and Meteor Showers
Join us on August 11 at 8 p.m. at La Bloc and August 12 at 8 p.m. at Black Brook Beach in Cape Breton Highlands National Park and discover the basics of astronomy while you watch for the Perseid meteor shower. Bring binoculars and telescopes if you have them and settle in for an evening of stargazing. For your comfort, wear warm layers and bring blankets, chairs, insect repellent and a flashlight.

The Great Louisbourg Sleepover
Come and enjoy a unique evening at the Fortress of Louisbourg National Historic Site on August 18 at 5 p.m. Camp on site, in the area of the King’s Bastion, for the Great Louisbourg Sleepover with live entertainment featuring the band Gravel Road. Test your knowledge for prizes and take in the campfire, stories and music. Food and drinks available for purchase. The cost is $56 per person, and includes breakfast, camping fees, as well as live entertainment on Saturday and admission to the site on Sunday for the Fête de Saint Louis. To book or for more information, please call 902-733-3548 and the email is info@fortressoflouisburg.ca.

Fête de Saint-Louis
This feast on August 19 was traditionally observed in 18th century Louisbourg and celebrates King Louis IX (St. Louis) the patron saint of the French Military. The day includes special military demonstrations, “residents” showing their best fineries in a procession and special food displays including Taste through History, a special program that invites you to sample taste popular recipes from these four historic years: 1758, 1868, 1918, and 1968. Savour every morsel as you hear stories from our interpreters in period costume. The cost for Taste through History is $10.80 per person. To book or for more information, please call 902-733-3552 or email fol.tourbookings@pc.gc.ca.

Aviation Day
Join us August 19 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site to celebrate the beginning of aviation in Canada with a day of festivities and aviation-themed activities. Nigel Isle, a local volunteer, will lead a foam glider workshop at 11:30 a.m. and a dragonfly helicopter workshop at 2:30 p.m. The workshops are appropriate for children five years and older. All materials are provided and participation is free with admission. Nigel will also have a variety of flying, gliding and hovering devices to demonstrate throughout the day. You can even try out a flight simulator!

Louisbourg at Night
There’s a lot to do in Louisbourg at night! On Mondays and Tuesdays, look for hidden clues and puzzles in order to escape the Escape Rooms. Escape Louisbourg features escape rooms with an 18th century twist! Two rooms start at 6 p.m. and two at 7:30 p.m. The cost is $120 + tax per team (for up to six people).

On Wednesdays August 1 and 15, be part of Picture the Past: Photography workshops hosted by award winning photographer Adam Hill. Get personal instruction on your camera and shoot the Fortress of Louisbourg National Historic Site at sunset and under the stars.
Gates open at 5 p.m. with the start at 6 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Cost is $50 per person, tax included.

The Would-Be Nobleman: A French 18th century comedy by Molière, adapted to English for modern day, is on stage on Thursdays. Snacks and refreshments available before the show and during intermission (cash only). Gates open at 6 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m. Cost is $30 + tax per person.

Mi’kmaw Youth Help Bring Back the Boreal!
Once again this year, youth from Unama’ki Institute of Natural Resources’ Nikani Awtiken youth camp will help conduct research as part of Parks Canada’s Bring Back the Boreal project on North Mountain August 7-14. This group will help look for moose pellets along grids on North Mountain. This valuable research helps monitor moose activity in that area of Cape Breton Highlands National Park.

Ride the Clyburn River
Float along the banks of the Clyburn River during a lazy tubing tour while learning about this special watershed and enjoying some tasty local delights. This activity is available on Sundays at 3 p.m. in Cape Breton Highlands National Park. Pre-registration is required by calling 902-285-2535.

Keep it wild, Keep it safe Ever hear of a bear jam?

It’s a traffic jam caused by people stopped to look at nearby bears. If you come across a bear jam, or any other traffic jam due to nearby wildlife, drive by slowly. If you decide to stop, pull over safely without blocking the road and make it a brief stay. Watch wildlife from afar and preferably from the safety of your car. This is the best way to stay safe and minimize your impact on wildlife. It’s also important to never feed wildlife. Feeding wildlife in a national park is actually illegal. Once an animal gets used to human food, it becomes a risk to public safety, and may have to be destroyed. For example, if they lose their “wild” instincts, they’re more likely to venture closer to campgrounds and nearby communities and become dependent on human food. They might also get too accustomed to traffic and be struck by a vehicle. Keep a safe a distance from wildlife; respect their space. Help us keep the “wild” in wildlife.

Bring Back the Boreal! – Cape Breton Highlands National Park

BringBacktheBorealNewsletterMarch2018

The health of the Boreal forest in the Cape Breton Highlands National Park is in decline. Forest species such as the lynx and American marten are struggling with the current loss of habitat and at-risk forest-dependent birds like the Bicknell’s Thrush are being replaced by grassland species. Part of Parks Canada’s mandate is to protect Canada’s natural heritage and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment for present and future generations.

It’s about restoring balance to this important ecosystem. For more on the project, visit parkscanada.gc.ca/BringBacktheBoreal. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact Rob Howey, Resource Conservation Manager, at robert.howey@pc.gc.ca or at 902-285-2527. Kelly Deveaux, Acting Superintendent, Cape Breton Highlands National Park

It’s about restoring balance to this important ecosystem. For more on the project, visit pc.gc.ca/BringBacktheBoreal. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact Derek Quann, Bring Back the Boreal Project Manager, at derek.quann@pc.gc.ca or at 902-285-4351. Éric Le Bel, Superintendent, Cape Breton Highlands National Park

Parks Canada’s Bring Back the Boreal team is in the third year of a comprehensive 4-year pilot project to restore the Boreal forest and engage local communities, visitors and partners. The health of the Boreal forest in the Cape Breton Highlands National Park (CBHNP) is in decline. Forest species such as the lynx and American marten are struggling with the current loss of habitat and at-risk forest-dependent birds like the Bicknell’s Thrush are being replaced by grassland species. Part of Parks Canada’s mandate is to protect Canada’s natural heritage and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment for present and future generations.

Bring Back the Boreal is about restoring balance to this important ecosystem. If you have any questions or comments about this project, please feel free to contact Rosie Smith, Bring Back the Boreal Project Coordinator, at rosie.smith@pc.gc.ca or at 902-285-3001.

October 2016 Newsletter

bringbacktheborealoctobernwsletterbulletin2016

Summer 2016 Newsletter

bringbacktheborealnewslettersummer2016

April 2016 Newsletter

BringBacktheBorealApril2016CBHNPNewsletterEN

Videos of interest:

  • Bring Back the Boreal: A story about Cape Breton Highlands National Park is available at http://www.pc.gc.ca/bringbacktheboreal. This animated video tells the story of the boreal forest.
  • Land & Sea’s “A Tale of Two Moose” and “Moose Cull” provide insight into moose populations in Nova Scotia, particularly in Cape Breton Highlands National Park. You can watch these videos at: http://www.cbc.ca/landandsea.

If you’re interested in learning more about Mi’kmaq treaty rights, the documentary called aptn Investigates: With Rights is also available at http://aptn.ca.

For more information about the Bring Back the Boreal project visit http://www.pc.gc.ca/bringbacktheboreal.

Cape Breton Highlands National Park’s Hiking Trails

(Distances are round-trip with average walking times)

Range from easy strolls to challenging climbs with panoramic views of canyons, highlands and seacoasts. The trails provide a chance to intimately explore the complex habitat of northern Cape Breton Island. Nature doesn’t end at the park’s boundaries. Many surrounding areas boast equally breathtaking trails

cbhnpmap-hiking-sept172015

http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/ns/cbreton/activ/randonnee-hiking.aspx

How To Reach Cape Breton Highlands National Park

Ingonish Beach, NS – B0C 1L0 Canada, Tel: 902-224-2306 Fax: 902-285-2866

Email: cb.info@pc.gc.ca / http://www.parkscanada.gc.ca/capebreton

Follow Us – twitter.com/ ParksCanada_NS

facebook.com/

CBHNP

facebook.com/ ParksCanada

youtube.com/ user/ParksCanadaAgency

Emergency Numbers;

  • Police, fire, ambulance: 911
  • Parks Canada visitor safety emergencies: 1-877-852-3100 

Summary of Parks Canada’s 2016 Moose Harvest in

Cape Breton Highlands National Park

Part of Parks Canada’s mandate is to protect Canada’s natural heritage and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment for present and future generations. As you know, the health of the Boreal forest in the Cape Breton Highlands National Park (CBHNP) is in decline. Forest species such as the lynx and American marten are struggling with the current loss of habitat and at-risk forest-dependent birds like the Bicknell’s Thrush are being replaced by grassland species.

The Bring Back the Boreal pilot project is about restoring balance to this important ecosystem. The project is testing different techniques in the park to find the most effective approaches to restoring the forest. One of those techniques, in the form of a moose harvest, is intended to reduce the moose population in Cape Breton Highlands National Park (CBHNP) within a 20 km2 area of North Mountain (2% of the park) and then to closely monitor the regeneration of the area over time. This year’s moose harvest started on November 8, 2016 and ended on December 10, 2016. We removed 50 moose during this period. The harvest was done in a humane and respectful manner.

It’s important to understand that this is a population reduction operation. The intent is to reduce the moose population with this 20km2 area (same zone as last year) as much as possible so that the forest is given an opportunity to regenerate itself. We will conduct an aerial survey of the area to help us confirm the reduction of moose within that vicinity. We will also provide more details in the New Year once we’ve had a chance to analyze the data gathered during the harvest.

Finally, in order to ensure public safety during the harvest period, Parks Canada had closed the 20 km2 harvest area of North Mountain to everyone except those directly involved in the moose harvest. Please note that access on North Mountain and Beulach Ban Falls Road, including Big Intervale Research Station, has now been restored. Derek Quann, Project Coordinator – Resource Conservation, Cape Breton Highlands National Park

Hike a trail. Plant a tree. Save a forest.

Last fall, visitors to Cape Breton Highlands National Park (CBHNP) witnessed the progress of Bring Back the Boreal as they hiked through the fence along the Skyline trail, built to protect seedlings from moose browsing. The area has turned to grassland and is unable to regenerate on its own, so Parks Canada is planting trees in the area. Moose like balsam fir but are not big fans of spruce, so balsam fir will be planted inside the fence and spruce trees outside.

In early fall 2015, Parks Canada hosted “Seedling Saturdays” and “Hike a trail, Plant a tree, Save a forest” events to give visitors and school groups an opportunity to help the forest by planting trees. Over 500 volunteers helped plant 5,100 Highland White Spruce seedlings outside the fence on the Skyline trail.

This year, visitors and local residents are once again invited to give nature a helping hand by planting a tree and walking the Skyline trail to experience how the trees grow, based on different planting methods.

Check out the next issue of this newsletter for more information about the tree planting opportunities coming up this spring. If you are interested in planting a tree to help save a forest in CBHNP, please contact us at 902-224-2306 or cbhnp.info@pc.gc.ca to learn more.

Special Events 2016 HELD

May

28-29 Cabot Trail Relay race

June

9 Hike a Trail. Plant a Tree. Save a Forest! Skyline trail

18 New Geocache launch Ingonish Beach soccer field

25 Bicycle Rodeo (Rain date Jun. 26) La Rigouèche day use area

26 Ingonish Triathlon

July

1 Canada Day Ingonish

2-8 KitchenFest!

16 Parks Day Teddy Bears’ Picnic Ingonish Beach soccer field

16 Three Peaks Challenge (Sold Out!)

16-17 Learn-to-Camp Ingonish Beach Campground

19 Live! At the Park – concert Chéticamp Visitor Centre

20 Coastal Life Discovery Program Clyburn Brook estuary

August

8-12 Junior Naturalist Day Camp Black Brook Beach

8-15 Nikani Awtiken Mi’kmaq Youth Camp

12 Star-gazing and Meteor Showers Black Brook Beach

13 Star-gazing and Meteor Showers La Bloc

18 Coastal Life Discovery Program Neils Brook estuary

September

3,10,17,24 Seedling Saturdays – Hike a Trail. Plant a Tree. Save a Forest! Skyline trail

9-18 Hike the Highlands Festival

21 National Tree Day

October

7-15 Celtic Colours International Festival

9 Celtic Colours Pumpkin Carving La Rigouèche

9 Celtic Colours Pumpkin Carving Warren Lake

10 Celtic Colours Guided Hike Corney Brook trail

11 Celtic Colours Guided Hike Acadian trail

12 Celtic Colours Guided Hike Mica Hill trail

13 Celtic Colours Guided Hike Franey trail

14 Celtic Colours Guided Hike Warren Lake trail

13-16 Huckle Buckle Festival Ingonish

Schedule subject to change. For a complete list of local festivals, music, shows and events, visit park visitor centres, parkscanada.gc.ca/capebreton, cbisland.com, cabottrail.travel, northerncapebreton.com or novascotia.com.

CBHNP Activity Guide 2016

The 2016 Activity Guide is now available on-line to download http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/ns/cbreton/~/media/pn-np/ns/cbreton/activ/2016/CBH_2016.ashx as well downloadable here: CapeBretonHighlandsNationalParkActivityGuide2016 There are also copies at CBHNP Visitor Centres in Ingonish, Victoria County & Cheticamp, Inverness County. This guide includes special events, hiking challenges, hiking trails, guided adventures, festivals, camping, play in the park, and much much more

Cape Breton Highlands National Park’s Hiking Trails

(Distances are round-trip with average walking times)

Range from easy strolls to challenging climbs with panoramic views of canyons, highlands and seacoasts. The trails provide a chance to intimately explore the complex habitat of northern Cape Breton Island. Nature doesn’t end at the park’s boundaries. Many surrounding areas boast equally breathtaking trails

cbhnpmap-hiking-sept172015

http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/ns/cbreton/activ/randonnee-hiking.aspx

Trail Distance Time Elevation
Acadian (loop) 8.4 km 3 – 4 hours 20 – 365 m
Salmon Pools 12.2 km 3 – 4 hours 15 – 110 m
Le Chemin du Buttereau 4.6 km 1.5 hours 25 – 65 m
Le Buttereau (loop) 1.6 km 30 – 45 minutes 0 – 55 m
Le vieux chemin du Cap-Rouge 9 km 2.5 – 3.5 hours 40 – 110 m
Corney Brook 6.5 km 2 hours 30 – 170 m
Skyline 7.5 km or
9.2 km (loop)
2 – 3 hours 290 – 405 m
Bog (loop) 0.5 km 15 minutes 410 m
Benjie’s Lake 3 km 1 – 1.5 hours 400 m
Fishing Cove 5.7 km or
12 km
2 – 3 hours or
5 – 6 hours
0 – 355 m
MacIntosh Brook 1.7 km 30 – 45 minutes 30 – 65 m
Lone Shieling (loop) 0.6 km 15 minutes 70 m
Aspy 9.6 km 3 – 4 hours 60 – 450 m
Glasgow Lakes Extension 7.9 km 3 – 4 hours 260 – 410 m
Jack Pine (loop) 2.3 km 1 hour 0 – 50 m
Coastal 11.3 km 3 – 4 hours 0 – 45 m
Jigging Cove (loop) 2.4 km 40 – 50 minutes 50 – 65 m
Green Cove 0.2 km 10 minutes 10 m
Broad Cove Mountain 2.3 km 1 hour 35 – 180 m
Warren Lake (loop) 4.7 km 1.5 hours 15 m
Branch Pond Look-off 8.1 km 2 – 3 hours 100 – 305 m
Franey (loop) 7.4 km 2 – 3 hours 95 – 430 m
Clyburn Valley 8.5 km 2 – 3 hours 5 – 50 m
Middle Head 3.8 km 1.5 hours 0 – 45 m
Freshwater Lake Look-off 0.3 km 10 minutes 10 – 45 m
Freshwater Lake 1.7 km 30 – 40 minutes 0 – 15 m

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